FAITH IN A SEED: PHILIP McCRACKEN’S SCULPTURE AND MIXED-MEDIA PAINTING

February 27 – June 5, 2016, Lightcatcher Building

Philip McCracken; Sprout, 1973; Bronze, 3.75 x 4 x 2 in. Collection of the artist.

Philip McCracken; Sprout, 1973; Bronze, 3.75 x 4 x 2 in. Collection of the artist.

Opening Reception: Fri., Feb. 26, 2016, 5 – 7 PM, Lightcatcher Building

Curated by Barbara Matilsky

Faith in a Seed: Philip McCracken’s Sculpture and Mixed-Media Painting surveys nature’s inspiration on one of the Pacific Northwest’s most distinguished artists. McCracken, born in Bellingham in 1928, studied with British sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986) in Hertfordshire and created diverse works that embrace both realism and abstraction, time-honored materials such as wood and bronze, and newer media such as resin and epoxy.  Read more

ROMANTICALLY MODERN: PACIFIC NORTHWEST LANDSCAPES

Opening Spring 2016, Old City Hall

Kathleen Houlahan, Mount Baker, 1930s; Oil on canvas, 2014.29.1. Gift of Nora Borgstrom.

Kathleen Houlahan, Mount Baker, 1930s; Oil on canvas, 2014.29.1. Gift of Nora Borgstrom.

Back by popular demand and displayed in the Old City Hall galleries, this exhibition highlights the rich legacy of landscape painting in the Pacific Northwest. All of the artworks, drawn from the collection of the Whatcom Museum, reflect the artists’ search for a spiritual experience that was often described as sublime in nineteenth-century Romantic art and literature. At the same time, the twentieth-century artists featured here interpret nature and express their emotional response to the landscape through modernist styles.

COLORFAST: VIVID INSTALLATIONS MAKE THEIR MARK

Opening June 4, 2016, Lightcatcher Building

Guest-Curated by Amy Chaloupka

Contemporary artists Ashley V. Blalock (CA), Elizabeth Gahan (WA), Damien Gilley (OR), and Katy Stone (WA) create site-specific installations fueled by vivid color for the Lightcatcher this summer. With varied media and processes, color meets improvisation, intuitive response meets open space in a comingling of movement, light shadow and striking hue. Viewers walk through, around, over, and under active fields of color. Much the way color is tied to memory, perception, and identity, we are enveloped by it. Color cannot be contained as installations escape the gallery, spilling into the hall and exterior spaces of the museum.