reframe-the-conversation

Partnership between Whatcom Museum and Bellingham Public Library Lets Anyone Enjoy Art, Nature, and Northwest History

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

The Whatcom Museum and the Bellingham Public Library (BPL) have teamed up to offer complimentary Museum passes to library card holders as a community resource.

The Museum pass, which are available for free to library patrons, allows entry for up to four people into all of the Museum’s buildings, including Old City Hall, the Lightcatcher building, and the Family Interactive Gallery (FIG). While there, visitors are able to take advantage of the exhibitions and programming that regular admission offers, including special presentations, and FIG workshops that are happening that day.

Bethany Hoglund, Head of Youth Services for the Bellingham Public Library believes that this partnership is important because it removes the roadblocks that prohibit some people from accessing arts and creative spaces in Bellingham. She also believes it helps further the library’s vision of being a place where all people, from babies to seniors, are able to find engaging activities and offerings.

“I love that this partnership with the Museum can be a natural extension of the public library, and vice versa,” said Hoglund. “Both have resources and materials to ignite creativity, challenge perceptions, and to explore.”

Last year, BPL distributed more than 380 Museum passes to people throughout the community, and the Museum welcomed roughly 650 visitors from those passes. The program has been expanded for 2018, with passes offered on all days that the Museum is open, Wednesday through Sunday. The Whatcom Museum and the Bellingham Public Library look forward to another successful year of the program.

“The more agencies within a community work together, the stronger the network of support and services for citizens becomes,” said Hoglund. “Partnerships such as this provide the opportunity for agencies to learn more about each other and learn from each other.”


For Those Interested:

To get one of these passes, library patrons will need to go online and register from the library’s website. Each family is allowed one set of passes every 60 days, and the passes are available only on the day selected by the person registering. There are only a limited number of passes available per day. Additional information can be found on the library’s website: https://www.bellinghampubliclibrary.org/.

To sign up, go to the link below and select “Register Online.” From there, select the day you’d like to visit the Museum from the calendar. After that, fill out the form at the bottom of the page. You’ll be sent a confirmation email. Bring your confirmation—either printed or as an email on your phone or tablet—to the museum and show it at the welcome desk for entry.

https://www.bellinghampubliclibrary.org/using-the-library/free-passes-to-whatcom-museum

 

Community Partnership: Audubon Society

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Sometimes two organizations come together to better achieve their missions. The Whatcom Museum and the North Cascades Audubon Society (NCAS) are an example of this. Through an ongoing partnership, both the Museum and NCAS have produced a variety of events, and most recently an exhibit, that have informed and inspired people throughout Whatcom County to explore the natural world around them.

The partnership began in 2013 when the Museum opened an exhibit in the Syre Education Center that showcased the Museum’s collection of taxidermy birds and Native American artifacts on a limited basis (two to three times a year for 2-6 weeks at a time). Shortly after the exhibit opened, Museum staff invited NCAS to help assist with education programs about the birds. NCAS agreed and representatives from the Society spent time each month volunteering to be present in the exhibit to answer questions and engage in conversations about birds with Museum visitors.

A collage of birds set up in the “John Eden Hall of Birds” exhibit.

More recently, when the Museum decided to move its founding collection of taxidermied birds in 2016-17 from the Syre Education Center to Old City Hall and create the John M. Edson Hall of Birds, which is open year-round, NCAS played a key role in the exhibit development.

“When planning began for moving the birds to Old City Hall, knowledgeable NCAS birders joined in and we discussed key birds to move (ultimately they were pretty much all moved!), and important themes for the exhibit. These became foundational to the new exhibit,” said Chris Brewer, a previous Museum educator involved in getting Audubon active at the Museum, and the current Audubon Board Education Chair.

The Hall of Birds showcases more than 500 mounted birds and provides opportunities for guests to learn about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. The NCAS is still involved with the Hall of Birds exhibit. Every fourth Sunday of the month from 1:30-3:30pm is “Audubon at the Museum,” where volunteer experts from the Society are available to answer questions that guests might have about the exhibit or birds in general.

The NCAS uses the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall as the venue for its monthly meetings and educational presentations on the fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9pm. The public programs are open to the public, and highlight a diverse range of topics, from bird habitat to the effects of climate change on migration patterns to highlights on specific bird species.    Read more

The History of Old City Hall

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Reaching into the sky with its four spires and clock tower, Old City Hall is one of Bellingham’s most iconic landmarks. Everyone in Bellingham has seen the building and many have been inside when they visit the Whatcom Museum, but fewer people know the long and interesting history behind it — and the many secrets that it holds.

Interior of Comptroller’s Office, c. 1913 Photographer Unknown: Whatcom Museum #1988.16.19

The story of Old City Hall starts more than 100 years ago. Prior to 1891, the New Whatcom City Council had been housed in the Oakland Block at the corner of Champion and Holly Street. However, as the government grew, it became evident that the City Council, which had shared the space with a clothing store, a music dealer and a hotel, needed something bigger. They asked local architects to submit plans for a new city hall and in November the council accepted a design from local architect Alfred Lee.

Lee, a self-taught architect, pulled the designs for the late-Victorian building from various catalogues and combined different plans together.

The council purchased a plot of land on a bluff overlooking Bellingham Bluff for $5000 and construction started in February 1892. Construction was wrapped up quickly when an economic depression in 1893 caused funds for the project to disappear, leaving the second and third floor interiors unfinished. One side effect caused by this abrupt stop was that the clock faces that had been installed didn’t actually work. Instead, the city moved the hands on the clock to permanently read seven o’clock. These didn’t last long, however, as strong winds eventually knocked out the clock faces and the city, not having the funds to replace them, simply left them as gaping holes.

The city did install a large, three-feet-in-diameter bell in the tower, which was rung to alert the volunteer fire department whenever there was a fire in the city. The height of the building made it easy to see any fires in the area.

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Supporting Our History and Mission

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

If you’ve been thinking about supporting the Whatcom Museum this year, Tuesday, November 28th is a great time to do it! Non-profit and charitable organizations around the world, including the Whatcom Museum, are taking part in #GivingTuesday.

#GivingTuesday is a global movement that celebrates generosity and kindness by giving financial support to nonprofit organizations across the world. After

Thanksgiving, many people are quick to descend upon Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals as a way to kick off the buying season, but philanthropy organizations across the world want to kick off the season by reminding people of the importance of giving to non-profits.

In this spirit, the Whatcom Museum encourages you to take part in this movement and support the important work we are doing in our community.

“While many people are aware that the Museum is a part of the City of Bellingham network, few know that a large portion of our budget is raised through the non-profit Whatcom Museum Foundation,” said Althea Harris, Whatcom Museum’s Development Manager. “Through contributions from our community, the Foundation provides the majority of funding for exhibits, programming, and the popular Family Interactive Gallery (FIG).”

Museums are one of the few places that brings people together to learn, and have fun, and the Whatcom Museum’s exhibits and programming are designed with the mission in mind—providing innovative and interactive educational programs and exhibitions about art, nature, and Northwest history to people of all ages.

Without the generous support of our patrons and community, we simply wouldn’t be able to realize this mission. Donations made on #GivingTuesday will provide our community with the unique experiences in history, nature, and art that we have been providing for more than 75 years.

Thank you for supporting the Whatcom Museum and the work that we do!

Holiday Shopping at the Museum Store

Boxed card sets by MoMA and Pomegranate.

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

With the holidays quickly approaching, you may be wondering what gifts you’re going to give your friends and family this year. Look no further than the Whatcom Museum’s Store inside the Lightcatcher building. The Museum Store has an assortment of items to fit anyone’s tastes and budget. Here are a variety of featured items you should consider for your next holiday gifts. Members receive 10% off purchase, and don’t forget, memberships make great gifts, too!  Read more

5th Annual Deck the Old City Hall a Great Way to Get into the Holiday Spirit

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Some of the many trees on display at the Old City Hall during Deck the Old City Hall

If you’re looking to get into the holiday spirit, look no further than Whatcom Museum’s Deck the Old City Hall. From November 24 to December 31, Old City Hall will be decked for the holidays for its fifth annual celebration. More than 20 decorated trees will be on display, along with garlands, wreaths, and more. There will be a variety of events to participate in as well, such as a holiday cocktail party and visits with Santa.

Admission to Deck the Old City Hall is by donation (regular admission applies to the Museum’s Lightcatcher building). The Museum offers admission by donation as a seasonal gift to the community, so there’s no need to worry if your wallet is a little slim from holiday shopping! Proceeds from donations benefit Museum programs and exhibitions.

Families interested in visiting with Santa can see him at Old City Hall on Sat., Nov. 25, Sun., Nov. 26 or Sun., Dec. 3, 12:30-2:30pm in the Rotunda Room. Visitors can take photos with Santa by the big holiday tree, and bring their wish lists to find out if they’ve been naughty or nice. This event is included with donation.

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A Closer Look at Art of the American West

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

When you first walk into Art of the American West: Highlights of the Haub Family Collection from the Tacoma Art Museum at the Lightcatcher building, you’re met with a brilliant, colorful painting depicting a Native American man. As you look to your left, your gaze falls upon a portrait of another Native American man painted in 1851 by Paul Kane. But if you look more closely at this painting something else may catch your gaze: two large medals that are affixed to the sash on the chief.

A patron looks at “Portrait of Maungwudaus,” c.1851 by Paul Kane (1810-1871). Oil on canvas, 30 x 25 in. Courtesy of the Tacoma Art Museum, Haub Family Collection, Gift of Erivan and Helga Haub.

This seems like a peculiar sight. “Medals?” You may ask. “What are these medals for and who awarded them?” The answers to these questions are quite interesting.

The man depicted in this painting is Maungwudaus, meaning the great “hero” or “courageous,” (known by his English name, George Henry). Maungwudaus was born circa 1807 on the northwest shore of Lake Ontario and was an Ojibwa interpreter, performer, and Methodist mission worker. In 1844 he formed a travelling Native American dance troupe, which included members of his own family and several Walpole Island Ojibwa. They traveled to Britain, France and Eastern North America to perform, and the show gained quite the reputation. Maungwudaus had the opportunity to perform for royalty such as the Duke of Wellington, King Louis Philippe of France and the king and queen of Belgium. The group continued to perform for several years in Canada and the US after leaving Europe.

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Making Faces: Masks and Masquerading Around the World

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Author Marty Rubin once said that, “behind every mask there is a face, and behind that a story.” These stories allow us to see the world in a better light. The Whatcom Museum invites you to join us as we explore masks and the stories behind them.

Masks carved by Native American artists from the Northwest will also be on display, presenting a

Tsonokwa Mask, carved by Scott Jensen

modern take on traditional masks from tribes around the region. At the event, you can learn how Pacific Northwest tribes used masks in their celebratory and religious ceremonies. Guests will also be able to try on several hands-on masks made in traditional Northwest Coast Native styles and make their own three-dimensional masks.

“Masks have played an important role in many tribal traditions throughout the world. They’re used for so many things, from ceremonies to ensure a good harvest or successful hunts and fishing,  to scaring away demons and curing illness. For some northernmost Native American tribes, masks hold sacred meaning and are used to convey ancient stories.” said Susanna Brooks, the Director of Learning Innovation at Whatcom Museum.

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Transcending Boundaries: Becoming Helmi

The Whatcom Museum’s online virtual exhibitions feature a variety of historic photographs, artwork, and ephemera that visitors can view at their leisure. Recently, the Museum has uploaded a new virtual gallery that showcases a sampling of artwork by Helmi Juvonen (1903-1985), which can be viewed HERE. Scroll down to learn more about the life Helmi.

Helmi Juvonen, Vantage, circa 1975-1976;
Gouache on rice paper. Gift of Dr. Ulrich & Stella Fritzsche.

Transcending Boundaries: Becoming Helmi

Helmi Dagmar Juvonen (1903-1985) was a Seattle-based artist who found success capturing the culture of Native American tribes across the Pacific Northwest. She was a persistent artist who strived to create art in a time where being a female artist was tough. Even as she struggled with poverty and mental illness, Helmi continued to create art until her final days.

Finding Her Love and Audience

Born in Butte Montana in 1903, Helmi found her love of art at a young age from her father, a Finnish immigrant, who made pencil sketches and watercolor paintings for her and her sister. When she was 15, her family moved to Seattle. During the time that she attended Queen Anne High School, Helmi sold handmade rag dolls and greeting cards at a local department store.

After graduating high school, she worked as a seamstress for a local company and took on small side jobs to pay her way through art school at Seattle Art School. Through these side jobs, Helmi established a line of connections that included affluent citizens and successful artists. In 1929, through one of these connections, Helmi got a scholarship to attended Cornish School (now Cornish College of the Arts) in 1929 where she studied puppetry and lithography. In 1930 she was hospitalized with manic-depressive illness (now known as bipolar disorder) and spent three years at Northern State Hospital.

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Dow Walling and the Comic World Of Skeets

The Whatcom Museum’s online virtual exhibitions feature a variety of historic photographs, artwork, and ephemera that visitors can view at their leisure. Recently, the Museum has uploaded new virtual galleries, which can be viewed HERE. Scroll down mid-way through the virtual galleries to learn more about one special exhibit featuring the comics of local talent, Dow Walling.     

Dow Walling and the Comic World Of Skeets

Dow Walling (1902-1987) was a self-taught comic creator and illustrator whose full-page color strip “Skeets” ran on Sundays in the New York Herald Tribune and in national syndication from 1932 until 1951. Walling was born and raised on a farm outside of Bellingham, Washington, and in a 1934 interview with the Literary Digest, describes his spunky young protagonist as “growing up in Bellingham – my home town….an average-size town in America [that] typifies the home town of the average boy.”

In the comic strip, Skeets rambles through fields and strolls down streets and alleys with his pal Button-Nose, cousin Eggy, and others while avoiding his nemesis Cue-ball Benson. Walling drew from events and places of his own childhood and featured locales such as Battersby Park and Whatcom Creek swimming holes in his illustrations. Read more