Supporting Our History and Mission

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

If you’ve been thinking about supporting the Whatcom Museum this year, Tuesday, November 28th is a great time to do it! Non-profit and charitable organizations around the world, including the Whatcom Museum, are taking part in #GivingTuesday.

#GivingTuesday is a global movement that celebrates generosity and kindness by giving financial support to nonprofit organizations across the world. After

Thanksgiving, many people are quick to descend upon Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals as a way to kick off the buying season, but philanthropy organizations across the world want to kick off the season by reminding people of the importance of giving to non-profits.

In this spirit, the Whatcom Museum encourages you to take part in this movement and support the important work we are doing in our community.

“While many people are aware that the Museum is a part of the City of Bellingham network, few know that a large portion of our budget is raised through the non-profit Whatcom Museum Foundation,” said Althea Harris, Whatcom Museum’s Development Manager. “Through contributions from our community, the Foundation provides the majority of funding for exhibits, programming, and the popular Family Interactive Gallery (FIG).”

Museums are one of the few places that brings people together to learn, and have fun, and the Whatcom Museum’s exhibits and programming are designed with the mission in mind—providing innovative and interactive educational programs and exhibitions about art, nature, and Northwest history to people of all ages.

Without the generous support of our patrons and community, we simply wouldn’t be able to realize this mission. Donations made on #GivingTuesday will provide our community with the unique experiences in history, nature, and art that we have been providing for more than 75 years.

Thank you for supporting the Whatcom Museum and the work that we do!

Holiday Shopping at the Museum Store

Boxed card sets by MoMA and Pomegranate.

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

With the holidays quickly approaching, you may be wondering what gifts you’re going to give your friends and family this year. Look no further than the Whatcom Museum’s Store inside the Lightcatcher building. The Museum Store has an assortment of items to fit anyone’s tastes and budget. Here are a variety of featured items you should consider for your next holiday gifts. Members receive 10% off purchase, and don’t forget, memberships make great gifts, too!  Read more

5th Annual Deck the Old City Hall a Great Way to Get into the Holiday Spirit

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Some of the many trees on display at the Old City Hall during Deck the Old City Hall

If you’re looking to get into the holiday spirit, look no further than Whatcom Museum’s Deck the Old City Hall. From November 24 to December 31, Old City Hall will be decked for the holidays for its fifth annual celebration. More than 20 decorated trees will be on display, along with garlands, wreaths, and more. There will be a variety of events to participate in as well, such as a holiday cocktail party and visits with Santa.

Admission to Deck the Old City Hall is by donation (regular admission applies to the Museum’s Lightcatcher building). The Museum offers admission by donation as a seasonal gift to the community, so there’s no need to worry if your wallet is a little slim from holiday shopping! Proceeds from donations benefit Museum programs and exhibitions.

Families interested in visiting with Santa can see him at Old City Hall on Sat., Nov. 25, Sun., Nov. 26 or Sun., Dec. 3, 12:30-2:30pm in the Rotunda Room. Visitors can take photos with Santa by the big holiday tree, and bring their wish lists to find out if they’ve been naughty or nice. This event is included with donation.

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A Closer Look at Art of the American West

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

When you first walk into Art of the American West: Highlights of the Haub Family Collection from the Tacoma Art Museum at the Lightcatcher building, you’re met with a brilliant, colorful painting depicting a Native American man. As you look to your left, your gaze falls upon a portrait of another Native American man painted in 1851 by Paul Kane. But if you look more closely at this painting something else may catch your gaze: two large medals that are affixed to the sash on the chief.

A patron looks at “Portrait of Maungwudaus,” c.1851 by Paul Kane (1810-1871). Oil on canvas, 30 x 25 in. Courtesy of the Tacoma Art Museum, Haub Family Collection, Gift of Erivan and Helga Haub.

This seems like a peculiar sight. “Medals?” You may ask. “What are these medals for and who awarded them?” The answers to these questions are quite interesting.

The man depicted in this painting is Maungwudaus, meaning the great “hero” or “courageous,” (known by his English name, George Henry). Maungwudaus was born circa 1807 on the northwest shore of Lake Ontario and was an Ojibwa interpreter, performer, and Methodist mission worker. In 1844 he formed a travelling Native American dance troupe, which included members of his own family and several Walpole Island Ojibwa. They traveled to Britain, France and Eastern North America to perform, and the show gained quite the reputation. Maungwudaus had the opportunity to perform for royalty such as the Duke of Wellington, King Louis Philippe of France and the king and queen of Belgium. The group continued to perform for several years in Canada and the US after leaving Europe.

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