SPINELESS: PORTRAITS OF MARINE INVERTEBRATES

Photographs by Susan Middleton
September 17 – December 31, 2016, Lightcatcher Building

Susan Middleton; Pacific Giant Octopus (juvenile), Enteroctopus dofleini; Archival pigment print, 24 x 36 in. Friday Harbor Marine Laboratories, University of Washington.

Susan Middleton; Pacific Giant Octopus (juvenile), Enteroctopus dofleini; Archival pigment print, 24 x 36 in. Friday Harbor Marine Laboratories, University of Washington.

The result of seven years of fieldwork across the Pacific Ocean, and showcasing the photographic techniques Susan Middleton has developed over the past three decades, this exhibition presents 50 portraits of rarely or never-before-seen ocean dwellers. Middleton visually isolates each creature she photographs to best capture its individual character and to spotlight the dazzling natural blueprints inherent in the marine invertebrate realm of life. From a juvenile Pacific Giant Octopus, to the Widehand Hermit Crab, Middleton’s images open our eyes to both the fragility and the resiliency of these species.

Susan Middleton is an acclaimed photographer, author, and lecturer specializing in portraiture of rare and endangered animals, plants, sites, and cultures. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship in 2009, for many years she was the chair of the Department of Photography at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, where she currently serves as research associate. Her photographs have been exhibited worldwide in fine art and natural history contexts and are represented in the permanent collections of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Gallery of Art. She is the author of Evidence of Evolution and Spineless: Portraits of Marine Invertebrates, The Backbone of LifeRead more

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC’S 50 GREATEST PHOTOGRAPHS

Steve McCurry; Afghan Border, Pakistan 1984. Haunting eyes and a tattered garment tell the plight of a girl who fled Afghanistan for a refugee camp in Pakistan.

Steve McCurry; Afghan Border, Pakistan 1984. Haunting eyes and a tattered garment tell the plight of a girl who fled Afghanistan for a refugee camp in Pakistan. Courtesy of National Geographic.

October 1, 2016 – January 15, 2017, Lightcatcher Building

The Whatcom Museum will open a major traveling exhibition this fall, National Geographic’s 50 Greatest Photographs, in the Lightcatcher building, the only West Coast stop of the national tour. The exhibition, which showcases some of National Geographic’s most compelling photographs, runs through January 15, 2017. From Steve McCurry’s unforgettable Afghan girl to Nick Nichols’ iconic image of Jane Goodall with a chimpanzee to Thomas Abercrombie’s never-before-seen view of Mecca, the exhibition includes some of National Geographic magazine’s most-remembered and celebrated photographs from its more-than-120-year history.

In addition to seeing the photographs as they appeared in the magazine, visitors to the exhibition will learn the stories behind the photos through text panels and video interviews with the photographers. For some images, visitors will be able to see the “near frames” taken by the photographer: the sequence of images made in the field before and after the perfect shot. The exhibition is based on the popular iPad app released by National Geographic in 2011 and featured by iTunes as an iPad “App of the Week.”

About National Geographic Traveling Exhibitions
The National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations and one of the world’s leading organizers of large-scale, traveling exhibitions. Since it launched Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs in 2004, National Geographic has organized two more Egyptian-themed exhibitions, Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs and Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt. Other exhibitions National Geographic has organized include the four-city US tour of Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul. National Geographic also offers a broad selection of stunning photography exhibitions to museums and venues around the world. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com.

This exhibition is sponsored by:
Archer Thompson, William Tanner, and Wilson Sheen; J. Marc Westenberger and Charles Marcks; Anonymous Contributor


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Want to be a Presenting Sponsor of National Geographic’s 50 Greatest Photographs? Contact Althea Harris at the Development Office  for details on how you or your business can participate.